Democratic Policies Make Minnesota America’s Top State For Business

(Image source: mprnews.org)
(Image source: mprnews.org)

An annual CNBC scorecard that rates each state on 60 measures of competitiveness finds that Democratic run Minnesota is the best state in the country for business in 2015. The same study found that while Republican-controlled states like Kansas and Arizona experienced sharp declines in their business competitiveness, Minnesota Democratic Governor Mark Dayton’s economic miracle has turned his state into the nation’s best state for businesses.

When Mark Dayton took office in 2011 he inherited a 6.2 billion dollar deficit from his Republican predecessor, Tim Pawlenty. Four years later, after passing a huge tax increase on wealthy Minnesotans, the state now has over a 2 billion dollar surplus, and one of the lowest unemployment rates in the country. Dayton’s Minnesota is the antithesis of Sam Brownback’s failed supply-side experiment in Kansas and Scott Walker’s union busting disaster in Wisconsin.

While the CNBC study acknowledged that Minnesota’s business tax rates were relatively high, they found that other factors like a strong education system and a good quality of life, offset high taxes in making the state more business-friendly than many other states with lower corporate tax rates.

In discussing the scorecard, CNBC’s analysts credited Mark Dayton for Minnesota’s success even though they acknowledged that his approach was not what economists or corporate leaders usually label “business-friendly” policies. The article reads in part:

But Minnesota doesn’t just stumble into the top spot by accident. The state’s path to the top is marked by a carefully crafted and still controversial strategy by Gov. Mark Dayton, the first Democrat to hold the office in two decades. The hallmark of his plan is something most governors seeking to win the hearts of business would never dream of: a big tax increase.

The tax increase on the wealthy worked. By increasing the state’s revenue and putting more money in the pockets of ordinary Minnesotans, Dayton’s economic plan spurred economic growth and reduced unemployment. The healthy economy that came about in the wake of those tax increases not only benefited workers, it also in turn proved good for business.

At some point supply-side loyalists will have to stop ignoring Minnesota’s economic success, and come to terms with the fact that the best place to do business in America isn’t where the taxes on the rich have been cut , but rather where they have been raised.

Minnesota is a shining example of how Democratic policies can help everyone prosper. Now if only the rest of America would start paying attention, instead of continuing to be hoodwinked by the empty promises of the GOP’s trickle down fantasies, that more often than not, bring about economic failure in practice.

21 Replies to “Democratic Policies Make Minnesota America’s Top State For Business”

  1. I thought Rick Perry claimed that title for Texas. Hes up to his old tricks again, when in doubt, make it up..Oops. My back made me say it.

  2. You see… what more proof do people need to see that Liberal policies will help all of us move forward and not backwards?

  3. Stop making sense. Ever since trickle down AKA piss on the poor has ben enacted it has been a failure. Now sane people know this but and I hate that I will piss off people, white people don’t.

    A village can not reorganize village life to suit the village idiot. That’s what the majority of white do.

    I wont even say its because of Obama because back in 2000 after years of growth under Clinton they rejected Gore because they wanted to have a beer with Bush.

    Its not about god gays guns whites, if you cant feed your children or provide healthcare for them then what you believe is bullshit.

    But I guess in the end its all about FREEDUMB

  4. It’s funny how the thug economic policies always seem to come with an asterisk. It is LONG past time to make them explain in excruciating detail EXACTLY how these plans of theirs will work.

    Sorry, I forgot to put an asterisk.
    There it is.
    *They can’t explain how their policies would and should work because they don’t and can’t.

  5. Unfortunately- we can be guaranteed that the Republicans and Conservatives will do everything they can to ignore Minnesota.

    Like Creationists and Evidence. Oil and Water.

  6. We here in Minnesota had enough of T-Paw and the mess he left us in. So we voted in a new house and senate full of Democrats. The last election, the house went to the Repugs and once again, they tried to give tax breaks back to the rich, while trying to cut social programs. In the spirit of cooperation, the dems went along with some of the changes, much to the chagrin of most Democratic voters in MN. We progressives never learn – Dem leaders should have held their ground and made the Repugs pay – THEY would have done it!

  7. And notice that Mark Dayton doesn’t go around to all the network shows bragging. He stays home in Minnesota taking care of business. Unlike a certain Governor in Wisconsisissipi aka Wisconsin.

  8. Right on Thom,
    They promote these vague ideas, with no facts or support, telling us, “oh, it will work, trust us”.
    They are too lazy to write a proposal or the legislation that would explain how it will work, or how it will be funded. Instead they wait for ALEC or corporations to write the proposals for them to introduce as legislation.
    This legislation is usually so poorly written that it ends up court. Typically it ends up being struck down as unconstitutional by a state or the federal Supreme Court. Because they poorly; written, researched, or thought out.
    oh, they will talk about it, how good it will be for; the country, the economy, all the jobs. What they don’t tell us is how they will do it, or pay for it. “Trust us”.

  9. It seems like a few years back I heard that Greece was letting its multi millionaires
    hide their money overseas to avoid taxes. If so, the republican plan is to let us be Greece, because that worked well for them!!!

  10. I’m a white person DJ, and there are millions more like me. I usually agree with you, but I don’t appreciate those types of generalizations. I have been a lifelong Democrat and Liberal and I know many others.

  11. I’m a white person too Terry.

    And you know what? Insults tend to flow off me (now) like water off of a duck’s back.

    Perhaps us White Folks need to police our own more often..

  12. The conservative commenters on that CNBC thread seem to be having a hard time coming to grips with the findings of this survey. If you go there and read the majority of comments it’ll be comedy relief believe me.

    If Texas was number one I’m sure those commenters would be saying how liberal policies don’t work.

  13. …I too live in Wisconsin…and I concur it’s PAST time to boot the Teatards, and return Wisconsin to its legitimate liberal roots…

  14. DJ, I agree with what you are saying. I do not find what you say the least bit offensive. I am Hispanic, NM born and raised. My first direct line ancestor born in NM was born in 1636. Neither of my parents spoke English so Spanish is my native language. But I am as white as can be and with every hair on my body being white, I look even whiter. I was a crib republican but I became a democrat. I am positive that Jesus approves of how I have helped others all my life. I even let a black intellectually disabled man live with us for 3 years because none of his worthless relatives would help him. I was smart enough to get him Social Security when a lawyer wouldn’t take the case. Signed, the Bleeding Heart Liberal. [WINK]

  15. Maybe it is time to start talking about California job creation under a democrat governor in comparison to Texas job creation under a republican governor.
    Texas, a right to work FOR LESS state, is starting to hurt. I do wonder why.

  16. I just had a heated discussion with my brother about the ACA and the flag of hate called the Battle flag of Virginia. I am a die-hard liberal who has lost more than one long-time friend to the fright-wing evangelical sickness so I do call more of “my” people out. I don’t like generalizations coming from either side, especially when it comes from someone with whom I usually agree, and who is usually better than that.

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