Donald Trump’s Post-Orlando Polling Is A Nightmare For The Republican Party

Americans continue to see Donald Trump’s presidential campaign in an increasingly negative light following the attack in Orlando, according to several polls out in recent days.

According to a new CBS News survey out Wednesday, a majority – 51 percent – disapprove of Trump’s reckless and erratic response to the nightclub massacre.

It should come as no surprise since the presumptive GOP nominee has spent the days following the attack congratulating himself and amping up his anti-Muslim policy proposals, all while leaders in both parties condemn his rhetoric.

The same CBS poll showed Americans more evenly split over Hillary Clinton’s response to the attack, but still giving the former secretary of state a net-positive rating.

Another poll out today from ABC News/Washington Post shows Trump with his worst negative rating since announcing his candidacy, with 70 percent of Americans saying they view him negatively – by far the worst result in history for any major party nominee.

Yesterday, a Bloomberg Politics survey didn’t just show Clinton demolishing Trump by 12 points nationally, but it also found that 55 percent of Americans would never support the presumptive GOP nominee – a number that would make it impossible for him to capture the White House in November.

In statewide polling, the news isn’t any better for Trump.

A Marquette poll released today gives Clinton a nine-point lead over Trump among likely voters in the battleground state of Wisconsin. It also shows that Republican enthusiasm is dropping, with the number of GOP voters “definitely voting in November” falling almost 10 points since March and 12 points worse than it was at this point in the 2012 campaign.

In Utah, the most heavily Republican state in the last presidential election, a Salt Lake Tribune poll out just a few days ago showed Clinton and Trump tied, with Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson claiming the support of 13 percent of respondents.

Overall, it seems that the combination of Clinton securing her party’s nomination and several weeks of missteps by Trump  – culminating in his reckless Orlando response – is beginning to take its toll on the spray-tanned billionaire.

The general election electorate isn’t as crazy as the one that gave Trump the Republican nomination. Unconstitutional Muslim bans, incoherent ramblings, and not-so-veiled racism don’t seem to be impressing them – and the man at the top isn’t all that interested in changing that.

For down-ballot Republicans who hope to keep their jobs this fall, it’s the absolute nightmare scenario.