Another Anti-Semitic Holocaust-Denying Republican Is Running for Congress

For some reason political candidates who deny the Holocaust ever took place are finding a home in the Republican Party. The latest is John Fitzgerald who, by finishing second in a California primary, has made his way onto the November ballot as a Republican candidate for Congress in the state’s 11th congressional district.

Fitzgerald is openly running as a Holocaust denier, and in an interview with The New York Times called it a “complete fabrication.”

In November Fitzgerald will face incumbent Democratic Rep. Mark DeSaulnier in the district near San Francisco which is solidly Democratic.

Even though Fitzgerald appears to have little chance to win, it is disturbing that someone with his extreme views has once again won a Republican primary for Congress.

In February we reported on Arthur Jones, a retired insurance agent in Illinois, who won the GOP nomination for Congress in his district. We described Jones as “a Holocaust denier, anti-Semite, white supremacist and former American Nazi Party leader.” Jones called the Holocaust “an international extortion racket.”

What we said about Jones at the time could also apply to Fitzgerald:

“By espousing the thoughts he has about the Holocaust, Jones demonstrates poor judgement on a level that must preclude him from getting anywhere near making the most basic decisions that affect people’s lives.

As important as judgement is, or in Jones’ case, the obvious lack of it, denying the Holocaust illustrates that the man lacks a moral compass, on the level of someone like Donald Trump.”

On his campaign website  Fitzgerald tells people to be aware of “Jewish supremacism.” Last week on a radio show hosted by an anti-Semitic host he said that “everything we’ve been told about the Holocaust is a lie,” according to The Times.

He also told The Times that the Holocaust was a “complete fabrication” and he said that the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks were actually committed by the Israeli government in an attempt to influence U.S. policy toward Israel.

Just last week Fitzgerald posted on his website a new article entitled: Why Are Powerful Jews Pushing Mass-Immigration And Forced-Multiculturalism Throughout The U.S. And Europe?

Clearly the man is an extremist, yet by representing the Republican Party on the November ballot he has at least an outside chance of being elected to Congress.

According to The Times article Fitzgerald said that because he has “friends that are Jewish” he should not be considered anti-Semitic.

“I have no issue with any people. I have issues with people who lie. It’s the elitists who control it all,” Fitzgerald was quoted as saying.

Because he finished second in the primary and was running as a Republican, the California Republican Party automatically endorsed Fitzgerald in the race.  After learning about his anti-Semitic views, however, they are no longer supporting him.

“As always, California Republicans reject anti-Semitism, and all forms of religious bigotry, in the harshest terms possible,” party chairman Jim Brulte said in a statement. “We reject John Fitzgerald’s campaign and encourage all voters to do the same.”

Fitzgerald told The Times that both political parties are controlled by “Jewish elitists” so he didn’t expect to get support from the party establishment.

Last month the GOP in California also denounced Republican Senate candidate Patrick Little because he also denied that the Holocaust ever took place while calling for a U.S. “free from Jews.”

Last year we reported that the Anne Frank Center had called upon White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer to be fired for saying the Holocaust never took place and claiming that Hitler never used chemical weapons.

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