Kellyanne Conway’s Husband Busts Trump for Intimidating Witnesses

George Conway, attorney and husband of White House adviser Kellyanne Conway, busted Donald Trump for publicly intimidating witnesses Monday morning minutes after the embattled Republican President tweeted a quote from Roger Stone that he will never testify against Trump.

Conway tweeted back, “File under ’18 U.S.C. §§ 1503, 1512,'” a statute referring to threatening and intimidating witnesses: “Whoever corruptly, or by threats or force, or by any threatening letter or communication, endeavors to influence, intimidate, or impede any grand or petit juror…”

Cornell Law explains the code to which Mr. Conway is referring (and look at the punishment) :

(a)
Whoever corruptly, or by threats or force, or by any threatening letter or communication, endeavors to influence, intimidate, or impede any grand or petit juror, or officer in or of any court of the United States, or officer who may be serving at any examination or other proceeding before any United States magistrate judge or other committing magistrate, in the discharge of his duty, or injures any such grand or petit juror in his person or property on account of any verdict or indictment assented to by him, or on account of his being or having been such juror, or injures any such officer, magistrate judge, or other committing magistrate in his person or property on account of the performance of his official duties, or corruptly or by threats or force, or by any threatening letter or communication, influences, obstructs, or impedes, or endeavors to influence, obstruct, or impede, the due administration of justice, shall be punished as provided in subsection (b). If the offense under this section occurs in connection with a trial of a criminal case, and the act in violation of this section involves the threat of physical force or physical force, the maximum term of imprisonment which may be imposed for the offense shall be the higher of that otherwise provided by law or the maximum term that could have been imposed for any offense charged in such case.
(b) The punishment for an offense under this section is—
(1)
in the case of a killing, the punishment provided in sections 1111 and 1112;
(2)
in the case of an attempted killing, or a case in which the offense was committed against a petit juror and in which a class A or B felony was charged, imprisonment for not more than 20 years, a fine under this title, or both; and
(3)
in any other case, imprisonment for not more than 10 years, a fine under this title, or both.
(June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 769; Pub. L. 97–291, § 4(c), Oct. 12, 1982, 96 Stat. 1253; Pub. L. 103–322, title VI, § 60016, title XXXIII, § 330016(1)(K), Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 1974, 2147; Pub. L. 104–214, § 1(3), Oct. 1, 1996, 110 Stat. 3017.)

Donald Trump thinks he can operate as he always has, even though he’s president. But he cannot. He is not above the law, even though he has been raised to believe he is.

If he had never run for and won the presidency, Trump would still be bullying and intimidating witnesses to aid and abet his criminal enterprise. But the teflon con is up now that he’s under the microscope of the presidency.

In no way will Trump ever pay what someone like Obama would have paid for similar infractions, but he will pay. Justice will catch up with Donald Trump, his family and gang. They made the mistake of over-reaching and Trump’s entitlement to power grabs and threats as a way of doing business continues in the public eye.

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