Trump Pushes More Lies About Covid As Death Rates Across The Country Continue to Climb

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More and more people are testing positive for Covid-19 and death rates across the United States are climbing as the nation prepares for the winter months. That’s in line with the projection scientists and public experts have made from the beginning, but President Donald Trump, who often claimed that the coronavirus would “disappear” after the November 3 general election, has continued to push more falsehoods about the virus.

“VACCINES ARE COMING FAST!!!” the president wrote earlier. This claim is misleading. While both Pfizer and Moderna have announced vaccines that are more than 90 percent effective, logistics will still need to be figured out if the goal is to vaccinate the majority of the American population.

President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris published their Covid-19 plan earlier this month, but thus far President Trump has ordered White House officials not to cooperate with the transition, further indication that he intends to push more unsubstantiated claims that the election was fraudulent.

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The delay is costing the incoming Biden-Harris administration valuable time, but yesterday President-elect Biden’s Covid-19 adviser said the new administration will “be ready on day one” to address the pandemic.

The president later asserted that new Covid-19 drugs on the market are “AMAZING, BUT SELDOM TALKED ABOUT BY THE MEDIA!” and claimed that mortality rates are down by 85 percent.

The president has repeated this statistic before. A fact-check conducted in September found that he is not telling the whole story.

“Experts say part, if not most, of the decline can be explained by expanded testing and a shift toward younger people — rather than higher-risk older folks — catching the coronavirus,” Factcheck.org noted at the time, pointing out that despite Trump “playing up the effectiveness of existing therapies and claiming credit for those discoveries,” experts are still on the fence about the effectiveness of these therapies and how they will improve treatment over time.