Trump Is Flagged by Twitter For Claiming Biden’s Popular Vote Tally Was “Illegally Obtained”

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Twitter flagged President Donald Trump under its civic integrity policy after he continued to post false claims about the election, this time claiming that President-elect Joe Biden can take office only “if he can prove that his ridiculous” popular vote tally was not “fraudulently or illegally obtained.”

“When you see what happened in Detroit, Atlanta, Philadelphia & Milwaukee, massive voter fraud, he’s got a big unsolvable problem,” the president added.

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Although the president has continued to claim that the 2020 general election was fraudulent, there is no evidence to support this. His own security agencies have disputed the claim. In fact, a recent statement from the federal Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), part of a joint statement from the Election Infrastructure Government Coordinating Council and the Election Infrastructure Sector Coordinating Executive Committees, revealed the agencies found “no evidence that any voting system deleted or lost votes, changed votes, or was in any way compromised.” The statement went on to refer to the 2020 general election as “the most secure in American history.”

Biden won the popular vote by a considerable margin. He received 80,063,589 votes, the highest number of votes received by a presidential candidate in the history of the United States. Trump received 73,904,195 votes, the most received by a sitting president.

Trump has long described his first election win as a “landslide,” but has failed to note that Biden defeated him by the same electoral margin Trump defeated Hillary Clinton by in 2016. But even that is misleading.

Nate Silver of FiveThirtyEight “found that the percentage of electoral vote won by Trump — 56.9 percent — was well below the historical average, 70.9 percent,” according to a Factcheck.org investigation conducted in 2016.

Factcheck.org continued, noting that “Silver found that Trump’s share of electoral votes ranked 44th out of 54 elections going back to 1804. Before that, he noted, “presidential electors cast two votes each, making it hard to compare them to present-day elections.”