Trump Continues to Push Debunked Dominion Conspiracy, Claiming He Won Michigan

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President Donald Trump claimed his campaign won the state of Michigan “by a lot,” further casting doubt on an election President-elect Joe Biden won decisively. Trump lost the state by a margin of more than 34,000 votes.

The president also continued to push a claim that voting machines maintained by Dominion Voting Systems, a voting software company used in 28 states, were vulnerable.

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Trump even urged Georgia Governor Brian Kemp (R) to “Do something,” insisting that the election in his state had been compromised.

But the claim that Dominion voting machines were compromised in some way has already been debunked.  A statement posted last month by the federal Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), part of a joint statement from the Election Infrastructure Government Coordinating Council and the Election Infrastructure Sector Coordinating Executive Committees, revealed the agencies found “no evidence that any voting system deleted or lost votes, changed votes, or was in any way compromised.” The statement went on to refer to the 2020 general election as “the most secure in American history.” 

These facts did not stop Trump from urging his Twitter followers to watch a broadcast from Fox News host Sean Hannity that gave still more air time to the Dominion conspiracy theory, which originated from the pro-Trump One America News Network (OANN).

OANN claimed, citing “data analysis” and without providing any clear evidence, that Dominion “deleted 2.7 million Trump votes nationwide.” A New York Times investigation found that there were explanations for voting irregularities in cases in Michigan and Georgia that involved Dominion software.

The Dominion software was used in only two of the five counties that had problems in Michigan and Georgia, and in every instance there was a detailed explanation for what had happened. In all of the cases, software did not affect the vote counts,” the Times reported.

The outlet went on to note that “In the two Michigan counties that had mistakes, the inaccuracies were because of human errors, not software problems, according to the Michigan Department of State, county officials and election-security experts. Only one of the two Michigan counties used Dominion software.”

Issues in three Georgia counties “had other explanations,” they continued. “In one county, an apparent problem with Dominion software delayed officials’ reporting of the vote tallies, but did not affect the actual vote count. In two other counties, a separate company’s software slowed poll workers’ ability to check-in voters.”