The Dam Is Breaking As Two Dozen House Republicans Are Expected To Support Trump’s Impeachment

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Donald Trump and his most loyal allies in Congress had one anti-impeachment talking point that they’ve been spouting since last week’s violent insurrection, and it officially went up in flames on Tuesday night.

Over the past week, they repeatedly said that impeaching the president after he incited a deadly attack on the U.S. Capitol would be a divisive exercise. They argued that the country should simply run out the clock on Trump‘s term and move on to other business once Joe Biden is sworn in next week.

Folks like Jim Jordan in the House and Lindsey Graham in the Senate suddenly acted like they cared about national unity and urged Democrats not to impeach Trump again.

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But with the bombshell news that Mitch McConnell is open to impeachment – as are a growing number of Republicans in the House – the argument that impeachment would be partisan and divisive has officially crumbled to dust.

The dam is officially breaking. This impeachment is bipartisan.

In addition to McConnell thinking Trump committed impeachable offenses, the number three Republican in the House – Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming – announced on Tuesday that she would vote to impeach the president.

“The President of the United States summoned this mob, assembled the mob, and lit the flame,” Cheney said in a statement. “There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution.”

“I will vote to impeach the President,” she said.

Another Republican lawmaker, Rep. John Katko of New York, said he, too, will vote to impeach Trump for inciting last week’s deadly attack at the U.S. Capitol.

GOP Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois will also support Trump’s impeachment, saying that he has “no doubt” that Trump “broke his oath of office and incited this insurrection.”

This is likely just the first batch of Republican lawmakers who will come out in support of Trump’s impeachment.

According to The New York Times, “The House is expected to pass the single charge on Wednesday, and a senior administration official said the White House expects about two dozen Republicans to support it.”

It remains to be seen whether there are enough Republicans of conscience left in the United States Senate to do what needs to be done, which is remove Donald Trump from power once and for all.

Impeachment is the unifying path to take

If pro-Trump, anti-impeachment Republican lawmakers are so concerned about bringing the country together – hint: they aren’t – then they would recognize that impeaching and removing Donald Trump is the unifying path to take.

Right now, the most divisive and dangerous move that members of Congress can make is to allow a sitting president and his enablers to incite a violent coup at the U.S. Capitol without any repercussions.

If they allow this high crime and misdemeanor to go unchecked, they are opening the door to future, more violent and deadly attacks.

As an increasingly bipartisan group of lawmakers are demonstrating, the most effective way to safeguard American democracy and unify the country is to impeach and remove Donald Trump from office immediately – before he can do any further damage.

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