Democrats Must Resist Recession Narrative and Critique Narrative of Trump’s Economic Success

This week’s stock market antics and the occurrence of an inverted yield curve have provided compelling evidence portending another economic recession.

These economic indicators, in addition to spurring stock sell-offs and turbulent market volatility, also sparked a firestorm of debate and commentary regarding how a potential recession would impact Trump’s 2020 re-election bid. read more

Understanding Trump’s Support for Israel as Part of his Racist, Anti-Semitic Agenda

President Trump, we should know by now, is the master of distraction, making it hard for the news cycle to keep up with his endless string of controversy-inspiring tweets and incendiary behaviors.  As the media gets caught up in dissecting the language and meaning of one text, he is on to something else. read more

Castro Tweet Controversy Reveals Fundamental Threat to Democracy, even from the Press

Castro Trump legal jeopardy

Back in the day, during the Reagan era, New York Democrat and Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan termed the GOP the “party of ideas” because of their growing reputation for intellectual prowess.

At the 2016 Republican National Convention, despite all indications to the contrary, self-proclaimed idea-man Paul Ryan kept this illusion alive, declaring, “It still comes down to a contest of ideas, which is really good news, ladies and gentlemen, because when it’s about ideas that advantage goes to us.” read more

Bridging Rural/Urban Divide Key for Democrats in 2020 and for Exposing Trump Failures

Just yesterday I attended a fair in Port Oneida, Michigan celebrating rural culture.

While the focus on Michigan, when it comes to economic matters, tends to be on the manufacturing sector, largely, of course, because of the dominance of the auto industry, the importance of the rural economy and population loom large, not just in terms of their essential role in U.S. life but also as a voting issue and bloc in the 2020 presidential election. read more

It’s NOT the Economy, Stupid; it’s a Stupid White Supremacy Undermining the Economy

When Donald Trump tweets something patently racist, as when he tweeted the squad of four should go back where they came from or when he derided Baltimore as “rat and rodent infested mess,” media pundits can spend days debating whether or not Trump is racist. read more

Beyond Disowning Trump, GOP Apostates Must Be Accountable for History of Exploiting Political Offices at People’s Expense

Joe Scarborough, former Republican but still self-proclaimed conservative host of MSNBC’s Morning Joe, has hoisted himself into media and political limelights of late with his popularizing of the moniker “Moscow Mitch” for senate majority leader Mitch McConnell, who has refused to bring to the senate floor for a vote a bill to fund measures to protect U.S. elections from Russian interference. read more

Cooked: Survival by Zip Code Re-Defines Poverty, Racism, and Climate Change as Disasters

Trump’s controversial tweet about sending the squad of four— Representatives Ayanna Pressley, Alexandra Ocasio Cortez, Rashida Tlaib, Ilhan Omar—back to where they came from has certainly captured the media’s attention the past week, recycling seemingly endless and pointless debate about whether or not Trump is a racist read more

Rampant Misogyny and Racism Challenge the Working of Our Representational Democracy

In the first round of Democratic primary debates, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand spoke up strongly not just in favor of women’s democratic rights but in favor of the necessity of having women representing themselves both on the political stage and in the proverbial political back room in advocating for their own interests. read more

Can an Economy be “Amazing” if it Promotes Sexual Violence?

When he resigned his position as Labor Secretary in the Trump administration yesterday, Alexander Acosta explained, “It would be selfish to stay in this position and continue talking about a case that’s 12 year old, rather than the amazing economy we have right now.”  For his part, Trump hailed Acosta as “a great labor secretary,” even going so far as to defend the plea deal Acosta’s office made with Jeffrey Epstein back in 2008. read more

Opinion: Why There’s No Deadline for Impeaching Trump

That the clock is ticking when it comes to initiating impeachment proceedings against Trump is steadily becoming a kind of common wisdom among Democrats and media pundits alike.

Writing for AP News, Laurie Kellman captures this increasingly popular position, insisting that “the tick-tock of time is an inexorable one as the 2020 presidential and congressional elections cast a widening shadow over Washington. As it spreads, the window for launching any impeachment proceedings shrinks, making the prospect of doing so beyond December unappetizing for wide swaths of Democrats.” read more

Democrats Must Discuss Public Education to Address 2020 Challenges and Russian Interference

In an interview on Morning Joe after two nights of Democratic primary debates, Colorado Senator and Presidential candidate Michael Bennet pointed out that during those two nights not one question was asked of the twenty candidates regarding educational policy. Indeed, he continued, no question was asked of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton in the 2016 Presidential debates. read more

To Whom is Trump Listening? Not American Workers or Corporations

Despite the fact that Donald Trump wooed disgruntled working-class Americans with promises to protect and even create well-paying jobs, it’s not hard to see that these promises were empty and that he’s been no advocate for the American worker.

Why Democrats Must Make Trump Economy Key Issue in 2020

Recently Republican Congressman Sean Duffy from Wisconsin, in an interview with MSNBC’s Chris Hayes, framed the looming prospect of Donald Trump’s impeachment as ridiculous.

His reason? The economy is supposedly booming. He told Hayes, “They have higher wages, lower unemployment. We’re killing it in Wisconsin. You want to impeach that guy?” read more

Founders Offer Wisdom for Protecting America from Fake News

In the early moments of the American republic, the nation’s sovereignty and security presented no small worry to the founders. In the 1790s, independence was in its fragile infancy, a nascent experiment threatened by the former mother country; and the French Revolution created anxiety those violent passions would spill overseas, inspiring more upheaval in the still roiling republic. read more

GOP Seeks to Destroy First Amendment and Democracy Itself

As Don Draper, the central character of AMC’s hit show Mad Men, likes to say, “If you don’t like what’s being said, change the conversation.”

For the GOP across the nation these days, though, the prevailing attitude is more to the effect of, “If you don’t like what’s being said, repress the conversation.” read more

How Civil Rights History Can Guide Democrats in Impeachment Decision

We need to know, and the nation’s knowing depends on Congress taking the lead, not waiting for the people's will to catch up.History shows that’s not how we realize our ideals and uphold the Constitution.

Playing upon American Hatred of Working Class, Trump Can’t Represent Workers’ Interests

In a tweet last March, Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez responded to the elitist assaults on her that attempt to diminish and discredit her intellect and governing abilities based on her working-class roots and identity:
“I find it revealing when people mock where I come from, & say they’re going to ‘send me back to waitressing,’ as if that’s bad or shameful. It’s as though they think being a member of Congress makes you intrinsically ‘better’ than a waitress.” read more

What Does an Authoritarian Approach to Higher Education Look Like? Ask Trump and Brazil’s Bolsonaro

We can hear the authoritarian echoes in both Trump’s and Bolsonaro’s policies to lower higher education.

Trump’s Ignorance of Global Realities Is Trampling the Working Class

The “then what” is that Trump’s insistence he can make up the rules when he doesn’t own the ball is inflicting devastating damage on farmers and workers in the U.S. and on the U.S. economy overall.T

Trump’s Economic and Environmental Policy: In the short term, we’re all dead

British economist John Maynard Keynes famously wrote in 1923, in a tract on monetary policy, “In the long run, we’re all dead.”

Economists have debated the significance of this wry theoretical phrase. Some have critiqued him, along with other economists who sought to moderate the austerity policies of governments during times of intense economic retraction, as not caring about the future or future generations. They accuse Keynes of being willing for short term benefit to enact policies that would damage the economy in the longer term, leaving ruinously burdensome debt, for example, that would debilitate the future economy for following generations. One critic even went so far as to suggest that because Keynes was gay and didn’t have children, he simply didn’t care about the future and could afford to adopt a recklessly short-termist approach to the economy. read more