White House

The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest, Washington, D.C..

It has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800. The house was designed by Irish-born James Hoban, and built between 1792 and 1800 of white-painted Aquia Creek sandstone in the Neoclassical style.

The modern-day White House complex includes the Executive Residence, West Wing, East Wing, the Eisenhower Executive Office Building — the former State Department, which now houses offices for the President’s staff and the Vice President — and Blair House, a guest residence. The Executive Residence is made up of six stories — the Ground Floor, State Floor, Second Floor, and Third Floor, as well as a two-story basement.

 

 

The main residence, as well as foundations of the house, were built largely by enslaved and free African-American laborers, as well as employed Europeans.

Out of respect for the historic character of the White House, no substantive architectural changes have been made to the house since the Truman renovation. Since the Kennedy restoration, every presidential family has made some changes to the private quarters of the White House, but the Committee for the Preservation of the White House must approve any modifications to the State Rooms. In 2013, President Barack Obama had a set of solar panels installed on the roof of the White House, making it the first time solar power would be used for the president’s living quarters.