Mark Meadows Talks Trump with COVID: “We’re in Trouble!”

It will not surprise anyone that Trump’s ever-present fear of looking “weak” (While constantly whining that he’s the world’s biggest victim), kept him from seeking real medical attention earlier in the course of his bout with COVID, demonstrating once again that Trump couldn’t care less that he put the country into a “who’s in charge?” chaotic position.

If there was ever a time that terrorists (of any type) might have considered a quick attack, it might’ve been the day Trump announced his positive test, knowing the White House’s pattern for evasion and understatement.

In a revealing interview with NTY reporter Maggie Haberman, Meadows describes White House doctor Sean Conley telling Meadows earlier in the day, Friday, October 2nd, 2020, how quickly Trump was deteriorating. Trump had only announced testing positive at 1:00 a.m. that morning and yet had been sick for days. But he quickly deteriorated Friday and yet still, only cared about looking “weak,” which seems to be the biggest wrong one can commit on this planet, in Trump’s mind.

Dr. Conley told Meadows that the White House didn’t have the resources they would need if Trump kept trending down (we laymen might speculate that Conley is referring to a ventilator because Trump was on oxygen in the White House). Meadows worried about telling Trump that they were running out of choices. From the NYT:

He described walking into Mr. Trump’s private residence to see him in a T-shirt, sitting up in bed. “It was the first time I had seen him in anything other than a golf shirt or a suit jacket,” Mr. Meadows wrote. The president, he said, was making phone calls and trying to work.

“If it hadn’t been for the oxygen tank by his side, I might have forgotten he was sick at all,” Mr. Meadows wrote. But his attention snapped back to Mr. Trump’s appearance: “I remembered what Dr. Conley had said. We were in trouble, and the president needed to get to the hospital.”

Given Trump’s focus at the time, one wonders whether the “work” Meadows references was campaign work. This was one month prior to the election.

Trump’s eyes were red and his hair was a mess. But it took telling Trump that it would be better for him to walk to the helicopter that day than being carried in a gurney sometime in the next two days.

It had previously been reported that Trump dropped his briefcase upon entering Walter Reed, Meadows says it happened in the White House, too:

Mr. Trump relented. On the walk out to his helicopter, he had lost so much strength that he dropped a briefcase he had planned to carry outside, where reporters were lined up to observe him, Mr. Meadows recalled.

The interview also reveals the secrecy that Meadows used to fly monoclonal antibodies from Florida in a private jet. At the time the antibodies were not an approved treatment.

Nothing in the interview will shock anyone used to reading about Trump’s obsession with only appearing “strong” and his lack of care over the problems his illness could have caused. As mentioned above, anyone, anywhere in the world, could easily have counted upon the fact that the White House was vastly understating Trump’s condition and if that group wanted to do something to attack the United States or an ally, this would be the 24 hour period to do it.

Certainly, no one contemplating an attack would worry too much whether Trump would have a hard time using his “judgment,” which was one of Trump’s greatest weaknesses. The group would be counting upon a normally chaotic White House being even more chaotic than usual, and there could easily be a: “Who is really in charge situation? Was it the guy who might need a ventilator or the vice-president, or maybe just Meadows, because of Trump’s

The interview just sheds further light on how Trump’s vanity and self-obsessed nature could have put the country and the world into increased danger.