Stacey Abrams Would Be “Willing to Serve” If Picked to Be Biden’s VP

Former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams says she would be “willing to serve” if Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee, picks her to be his running mate.

“As a young black girl growing up in Mississippi, I learned that if I didn’t speak up for myself no one else would,” Abrams told “Meet the Press” host Chuck Todd. “I was raised to tell the truth, so when I’m asked a question, I answer it as directly and honestly as I can. So my mission is to say out loud, if I’m asked the question: Yes, I would be willing to serve.”

“For the last year and a half, I have run three national organizations including Fair Fight 2020, which is in 18 states protecting the right to vote. I’ve been traveling the country promoting a census that is accurate and that helps us prepare for the next pandemic and for redistricting,” she said. “I believe in doing the work. I’ve been doing it since the day I did not become governor and I will continue to do so.”

You can watch Abrams’s remarks below.

EARLIER: Former candidate for governor in Georgia Stacey Abrams says she would be ready to serve as Joe Biden’s vice presidential pick. #MTP @StaceyAbrams: “As a young black girl growing up in Mississippi, I learned that if I didn’t speak up for myself no one else would.” pic.twitter.com/7WJbh1cbNX read more

Stacey Abrams: Brian Kemp’s Decision to Open Georgia’s Economy Has “No Logic”

Stacey Abrams Election

Stacey Abrams, the former Georgia gubernatorial candidate who lost to Governor Brian Kemp (R) following a contentious election riddled with accusations of voter fraud, says there is “no logic” to her former opponent’s decision to open the economy.

“There is no logic and that’s part of the problem,” Abrams told View co-host Ana Navarro. “We only shut down Georgia two weeks ago. So let’s remember, we were one of the last states to respond to the call for the shutdown because the governor did not recognize that asymptomatic people could spread the disease.”

“We are seeing our rates over the last two weeks, not decline, and we know that you cannot perform a tattoo from six feet away. You can’t do someone’s nails from six feet away, but I want you to remember who you saw the last time you walked into a nail salon — who you saw working on the front lines at a restaurant,” she added. “Those are the people who need to be home protecting themselves and their families, making sure that they are safe because they are often the only breadwinners, and instead of protecting their lives, we are prioritizing the potential of the economy.”

Abrams added that the Senate’s support for an enlargement of the Paycheck Protection Act is the right choice as many grapple with financial uncertainty amid the coronavirus pandemic.

“That’s the solution to the economic challenges we face, not putting people’s lives on the line so you can say you did something,” she said.

During a separate appearance on CNN political commentator David Axelrod’s podcast “The Axe Files,” Abrams said Kemp’s decision to reopen the economy would disproportionately harm low-wage workers.

“The more insidious part of what he’s doing is that he claims this is to support small business owners,” Abrams said. “And that may be true, but the front-line workers tend to be low-wage workers who, right now, because they are furloughed or cannot go to work, can collect unemployment and protect themselves.”

“Instead of fixing an unemployment system that is not processing people fast enough, his response is to send those people back to the front lines without the protective equipment that they need,” she continued. “Without any assurances that the owners that they will work or will actually do what they’re supposed to.”

Opinion: Obama’s Endorsement Challenges Biden, Re-Imagines Presidency for the Future

Last Tuesday, former President Barack Obama gave his much-anticipated endorsement of his former Vice President Joe Biden’s presidential candidacy. 

The endorsement was expected, of course, despite the wait Obama imposed, which seemed likely attributable to his preference to time his speech in the wake of Bernie Sanders’ own endorsement of Biden, creating a crescendo effect. read more

Stacey Abrams on Joe Biden: “I Would Be an Excellent Running Mate”

Stacey Abrams, who became a political darling among Democrats following her Georgia gubernatorial campaign, says she would feel “honored” if chosen to be Joe Biden’s running mate in his campaign for the presidency.

“I would be an excellent running mate,” Abrams said in an interview with Elle.

“I have the capacity to attract voters by motivating typically ignored communities,” Abrams continued. “I have a strong history of executive and management experience in the private, public, and nonprofit sectors. I’ve spent 25 years in independent study of foreign policy. I am ready to help advance an agenda of restoring America’s place in the world. If I am selected, I am prepared and excited to serve.”

Abrams said she has a keen understanding of what the potential role would entail, too.

“The VP’s job is to be chief lieutenant and partner by taking on the roles and responsibilities assigned to you by the president,” she said. “I am very self-aware, and I know that my résumé…is usually reduced to ‘She didn’t become the governor of Georgia.’ But it is important to understand all the things I did to prepare for that contest.”

“That campaign was not a whim. It was the outcome of decades of deliberate work building my capacity to serve as many people as I could, in the most effective way possible,” she continued. “My responsibility is to be ready to do the job—to have the core capacities that are embedded in the role. I am able to stand effectively as a partner, to execute a vision, and to serve the vision of the president.”

Abrams also had positive words to say about the Democrats’ response to the coronavirus pandemic, which has claimed more than 27,000 lives in the United States since the first death was reported on February 29.

“The Democratic Party has shown its strength and its cohesion during the coronavirus pandemic,” she says. “Governors are standing up and saying we will lead when those who should do not. Mayors and members of city councils are showing the best of who we can be. They are bolstered by the national apparatus amplifying their message.”

“This moment is a perfect reminder that there is no national coven, no cabal declaring, ‘Democrats, here’s what we’re going to do on Thursday,'” she added. “The quality of the party is us. We are Democrats. We set the tone. We set the agenda. Those we elect to every level of government are part of it. Let’s tell our story from the bottom up, not just the top down.”

Abrams’s name has been floated as a likely contender for the coveted position. Her statements come after Biden received high profile endorsements from former President Barack Obama and Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.)

With Promises Made Of A Woman VP Nominee, Who Do Voters Want Picked To Run?

Healthcare reform, coronavirus, and who could beat President Donald Trump in a general election matchup were all obvious topics that viewers should have expected to be discussed in the debate between Democratic Party candidates Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders on Sunday night.

But a promise from Biden also made headlines — the pledge that a woman vice-presidential candidate would run alongside him, should he get the nomination.

Sanders made a similar promise, saying he was going to highly consider a woman to run with him too, but Biden’s words were more committal.

“If I’m elected president, my cabinet, my administration will look like the country and I commit that I will, in fact, appoint a woman to be vice president,” he said in the debate.

Biden didn’t give any details on who he was thinking of. But according to polling from last month, there are a few names that top the list of Democratic voters’ opinions that he should give strong consideration toward.

An Emerson poll from mid-February asked respondents who should be the Democratic candidate for vice president. A clear plurality, 20 percent, said it should be current U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris, who also ran for president in the Democratic primary but dropped out early due to losing momentum during her campaign.

The poll, which also included men in its questioning, placed Andrew Yang in second place, with 18 percent. Former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton came in third, with 16 percent saying she should be VP, and former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams came in fourth, with 8 percent saying she should be the nominee.

Women are the majority of the U.S. population, but we’ve never had a woman president.

There are plenty of inspiring, qualified women in American politics who could be president.

One of them must be on the Democratic ticket in November. https://t.co/9AgienhXhd read more

McCaskill Begs Abrams to Run for the Senate and ‘Take Down McConnell’

Stacey Abrams and Claire McCaskill

During a TV appearance when the discussion was all about whether or not Stacey Abrams would run for president in 2020, a former U.S. senator practically begged her to run for a Senate seat in Georgia instead.

The former senator, Claire McCaskill of Missouri, made a strong pitch directly to Abrams, saying that if she were to run for senate seat in Georgia she could help end Mitch McConnell’s tenure as majority leader.

Abrams appeared today on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” to discuss her decision on running for office after her loss in Georgia’s gubernatorial race last November. She lost narrowly in a contest that was marred by claims of massive voter suppression.

She has vowed that if she runs for another statewide office in Georgia, she and other Democrats in the Peach State will not allow themselves to be victimized again by Republican voter suppression efforts.

McCaskill, the former Democratic senator who is now an MSNBC TV analyst, asked the charismatic young African American woman from Georgia to help take down McConnell.

“I think you’ve got a really hard decision,” McCaskill told Abrams. “I think you’re an amazing leader, and I am so proud of who you are and what you’ve accomplished – -say that first.”

McCaskill then slammed her former colleague, Georgia senator David Perdue for being a blind supporter of Donald Trump, and indicated that Abrams would be a huge improvement.

“The difference between leadership in the United States Senate between David Perdue and Stacey Abrams is night and day,” McCaskill said. “I mean, he is a sycophant for Donald Trump, he is all things Trump. He’s not even thoughtful about it.”

She pointed out that Democrats could not advance their agenda in the U.S. Congress so long as McConnell stood in the way as Majority Leader.

“I really do think that it will be very hard for us to what we want to do in this country as long as Mitch McConnell is running the show in the United States Senate,” McCaskill said. “So I want you to do whatever your ambition and your planning leads you. I use the word ‘ambition’ because I’m proud of your ambition, women need to own their ambition — I think that’s terrific.”

She said Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer had helped her overcome her own second thoughts about running for Senate in 2006, but she did, and that helped Democrats take control.

“We took the Senate by three narrow races, in Virginia, Montana and Missouri, and that was in 2006,” McCaskill said. “I think we could repeat that in 2020, but maybe not without you.”

Abrams said she also has received feedback and encouragement from Schumer, to help her make her decision.

However, she was very clear in saying that she still has not decided what she will do next.

“Leader Schumer has been nothing but gracious,” Abrams said. “He’s been very intense and very intentional, and I appreciate that — I appreciate the input. My job is to make sure, one, I’m the right person for the job, two, that it’s the right time, three, that this is the right job that I need to hold.”

But she agreed that someone should replace the junior senator from Georgia.

“I share your disappointment about David Perdue,” Abrams said, laughing.

Stacey Abrams Needs to Have a Future in Politics, and the Future is Now

For many reasons this is a very unusual time in American politics. Three of the Democratic Party’s rising stars all lost elections last November: Beto O’Rourke and Andrew Gillum, along with Stacey Abrams.

But for all of these three talented young leaders there must be made a place — not just in the party, but in elected office. O’Rourke is running for president, and there is a good chance that Abrams will be running for the senate. (Gillum’s plans for the future aren’t known, but he is leading

a massive voter registration effort in his home state of Florida read more

Stacey Abrams Has Built a “Massive Political Network”

Stacey Abrams

Stacey Abrams of Georgia is now a national powerhouse in Democratic Party politics, but few people know about it.

After narrowly losing the governor’s race in the Peach State in November Abrams has quietly built a “massive political network” that will make her an instant force once she decides what her next move will be. She has told supporters she will announce soon whether she’ll run for president or senator or something else.

Stacey Abrams is set to reveal soon whether she’ll run for president or senator or something else.

But in recent months, the Democrat has mounted an effort to expand her donor and political network that will make her an instant force whatever she decides https://t.co/qA9tWNOw7o read more

Biden Debates Explosive Launch Naming Stacey Abrams as His Running Mate

New reporting this morning has revealed that former vice president Joe Biden may soon announce he is running for president, and at the same time might announce that Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams will be his running mate if he wins the Democratic Party nomination next year.

The report came from Axios and is based on conversations with Biden advisers who are close to the potential candidate’s decision making process.

Biden’s aides reportedly believe that pairing him with Abrams would show he is not “just another old white guy.”

Biden, 76, has not yet jumped into the race, but would join a pool of Democrats historically diverse in age, race and gender.

Abrams is seen as a rising Democratic star, and nearly became the first African American woman elected governor of any state. She fought a tough gubernatorial campaign in Georgia last year, and even though she was ultimately unsuccessful, she has maintained a national profile. She was chosen to deliver the Democratic response to Donald Trump’s State of the Union address in January and did an excellent job.

It was reported last week that the former vice president is considering an early vice president selection for his campaign, and has discussed the possibility with his advisers and other top party figures.

According to Axios, Biden’s advisers are undecided about an early VP announcement. They have concerns that announcing Abrams as a running mate will be seen as a “gimmick,” and will open Biden up to criticism that he is overlooking other Democratic candidates as possible running mates.

Biden and Abrams met last week amid rumors of both candidates entering the race. Abrams has met with a number of other 2020 Democrats as well, including Sens. Elizabeth Warren, (Mass.), Kamala Harris (Calif.) and Cory Booker (N.J.).

Abrams Has Two Conditions If She Is Going to Run

The Associated Press reported this morning that:

“Abrams is willing to meet with any candidate running for president in 2020, but warned she has two ground rules before she starts meeting with the wide range of Democratic hopefuls.” read more

A Defiant Stacey Abrams Says ‘I’m Going to Run Again’

Stacey Abrams

Democrat Stacey Abrams, who lost a heated and controversial Georgia governor’s race against Republican Brian Kemp, has announced that she will definitely run for public office again.

“Yes, I’m going to run again,” she told an enthusiastic crowd at Fortune’s “Most Powerful Women Next Gen Summit” in Laguna Niguel, Calif. “What it is I’m going to run for I haven’t decided yet. Stay tuned.”

Abrams said her focus has been and will continue to be on policy and social justice issues.

“I care about policy, I am driven by a commitment to justice, to ending poverty, to addressing social needs and using public policy as a tool to improve the lives of those around us,” she told her audience.

Abrams also said that despite the disappointment of losing last month’s race for governor of Georgia, she was also happy about some of the outcomes and results of her efforts. She said that her campaign was a success for the way it energized infrequent voters and got them involved in the political process.

“We turned out voters who had never been engaged in the body politic,” she said proudly. “We tripled the number of Latinos who voted. We tripled the number of Asian-Americans. We increased African-Americans by 38 percent, increased the youth vote.”

Abrams also explained why she did not concede the race to Kemp, who was known for using many voter suppression tactics.

“There’s a moral and legal nature to conceding. It means you accept that something is right, just, proper. What happened [in our governor’s race] was not just,” she said.

“It’s about thousands of people who were denied the right to vote,” she said, alluding to the evidence during the campaign that Kemp, who was Georgia’s secretary of state, suppressed Democratic voters through many different policies.

Kemp denied voter suppression allegations and refused to resign or recuse himself from his government position during the campaign, a position that was heavily criticized.

Abrams has not given up on her fight for fairness and justice. She is still working with her organization

Fair Fight Georgia read more

Cummings Wants Brian Kemp To Testify About Voter Suppression

The incoming chairman of the powerful House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, Rep. Elijah Cummings, has his sights set on Brian Kemp, the Republican governor-elect of Georgia.

Before using widespread voter suppression tactics to cheat in his race against Democrat Stacey Abrams, Kemp was the Georgia Secretary of State. This position put him in charge of the elections for the entire state. And he used this position well — for his own advantage.

Most observers believe that if Kemp had not used every trick in the book to suppress minority votes throughout Georgia that Abrams would have won, and become the country’s first African-American female governor.

So now Cummings says he wants Kemp to testify before his Congressional committee about all of the voter suppression charges against him.

“I want to be able to bring people in, like the new governor-to-be of Georgia, to explain … why is it fair for wanting to be secretary of state and be running [for governor],” Cummings told HuffPost in an article published Monday.

Kemp’s hard-fought and controversial contest against Abrams was brought many calls by independent observers for him to resign. They said it was not fair for him to keep his post overseeing the state’s elections while he ran for governor at the same time.

After the November 6 election was over, Abrams, through a group she founded, filed a lawsuit in federal court in Georgia. The goal of the lawsuit is not to overturn the election results but to overhaul the state’s election procedures and processes to make them more fair.

“It was not a free and fair election,” Abrams said after conceding the election to Kemp on November 20.

The lawsuit maintains that all of the current Georgia election processes are discriminatory. Abrams said often during her unsuccessful campaign, and afterwards, that elections in Georgia are very unfair and have the effect of disenfranchising Democrats and minorities.

One example cited was the reports that several months before the election it was discovered that a hugely disproportionate number of Georgia’s many thousands of stalled voter applications were from African Americans.

Rep. Cummings told HuffPost that he has definite plans to investigate the issue of voter suppression when Democrats are the majority in the 116th Congress and he assumes the chairmanship.

Cummings said he also wants to call on election officials from other states, such as Kansas and North Carolina, who have been accused of suppressing Latino and African-American votes.

He specifically mentioned county clerk Debbie Cox from Ford County, Kansas. She has been criticized, and is facing more scrutiny over her decision to move the only polling location in a city with a 50 percent Latino population outside the city limits. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) sued over the move, saying it had the intent and the effect of limiting the voting power of Latinos and other minorities.

Democrats coming into power in the new Congress in January have promised that they will take on voting rights as a key part of their agenda next year.

In fact, probable new Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi said she will

push propose a comprehensive package of reforms targeting campaign finance, ethics and voting rights laws read more

Abrams Files New Lawsuit in Georgia; Hopes to Force Runoff

Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams has filed a new lawsuit as she continues to try to force a runoff in the too-close-to-call election which has made national news. 

In the lawsuit, filed Sunday, Abrams is trying to stop two counties from rejecting absentee ballots and provisional with minor mistakes, according to The Washington Post.

Although Abrams has not yet conceded the election, her opponent, Republican Brian Kemp has already declared that he is the winner.

Kemp’s lead is currently fewer than 59,000 votes with 100 percent of precincts reporting. The Abrams campaign still maintains, however, that there is a sufficient number of uncounted ballots to force a runoff election.

In her lawsuit Abrams is also asking Georgia election officials to count provisional ballots from voters who have changed addresses but not updated their voter registration. She is also asking for an extended deadline for the submission of final vote counts to give them more time to certify the election results.

Abrams’s campaign manager Lauren Groh-Wargo told reporters Sunday that the campaign does not have confidence in the secretary of state’s office, according to

The Post. read more

Georgia’s Tight Governor Race Points Out Kemp’s Voter Suppression

Republican Georgia gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp is demanding that his opponent, Democrat Stacey Abrams, concede in a race where all of the votes have not yet been counted.

Prominent civil rights groups, as well as Democrats all over the country, are urging her to stay in the fight.

Bernie Sanders tweeted his thoughts about the importance of what is going on in Georgia:

“The election in Georgia is not only about who becomes Governor. It is about protecting the basic tenets of American democracy. @staceyabrams has run a brilliant and inspiring campaign, overcoming enormous obstacles. Now, GA officials must count every vote.”

The election in Georgia is not only about who becomes Governor. It is about protecting the basic tenets of American democracy. @staceyabrams has run a brilliant and inspiring campaign, overcoming enormous obstacles. Now, GA officials must count every vote. https://t.co/jgrfgIGV0z read more

Racist Robocalls Are Targeting Oprah and Stacey Abrams in Georgia

Georgia Republican governor candidate Brian Kemp really didn’t need any outside help to make him appear racist. He was doing that very well all by himself.

However over the weekend Kemp got some help anyway, as a white supremacist group that targeted Florida gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum with racist robocalls began targeting Kemp’s opponent, Georgia Democratic governor candidate Stacey Abrams.

The recorded phone message has on it a voice that attempts to impersonate Oprah Winfrey.

Oprah was in Georgia on Thursday campaigning for Abrams, holding town hall meetings and canvassing door-to-door.

The robocall, which went out to Georgia voters, contains overtly racist and anti-Semitic language. There was no information available as to exactly how many voters received the call or have heard the message.

When he heard about what was going on Kemp became angry and issued a statement saying that the robocall was “absolutely disgusting.”

“I stand against any person or organization that peddles this type of unbridled hate and unapologetic bigotry,” Kemp said in his statement. “These vile efforts to degrade and disparage others are contrary to the highest ideals of our state and country. We unequivocally condemn this group and their horrible actions.”

Abigail Collazo, Abrams’ director of strategic communication, sent out her own statement on Saturday.  

In it, she accused Kemp and President Donald Trump of creating a political atmosphere that encourages such expressions of hate.

“Over the last few weeks we’ve seen increasing desperation from many dark corners trying to steal the election, cheat, lie, and prey on people’s fears rather than having the respect to listen to voters and speak to their hopes,” Collazo said.

She added that it was “pathetic” that Kemp “has only now suddenly decided to find a conscience as polls are tightening and Georgia voters are making it clear that they reject the kind of hate he and his allies have been spewing around the state. These automated calls are being sent into homes just days before President Trump arrives, reminding voters exactly who is promoting a political climate that celebrates this kind of vile, poisonous thinking.”

The group behind the robocall is The Road to Power, a white supremacist and anti-Semitic video podcast hosted by Scott Rhodes of Idaho.

The same neo-Nazi group had targeted Gillum with racist robocalls after he won the Democratic Florida gubernatorial nomination in the late-August primary and again in October.

Recent polls have shown that Abrams is

running neck and neck with Kemp read more

Oprah Winfrey Storms Georgia And Takes On GOP Voter Suppression

Oprah Winfey didn’t just campaign for Democrat Stacey Abrams. She took on voter suppression in Georgia.

Winfrey said:

The reality is that we see the injustices big and small all around us every single day of our lives, and I know it is easy for a lot of people to feel that you have no power against the injustices, and this what I am here to tell you that this land was made for you and me. This land was made for you and that is not just the song, that’s the truth.

I will tell you — I will tell you that we are not powerless. Every single one of us, every single one of us has the same power at the polls. Every single one of us has something that if done in numbers too big to tamper with cannot be suppressed and cannot be denied. As the civil rights predecessors used to say, we shall not be moved. So every single one of us has the same power at the polls. We have the ability to go into the tiny booth or in my neighborhood, it is not a booth, but a little stand and every one of us, regardless of the color of our skin, and it does not matter when you are there at the polls. Or the god we pray to, it does not matter. Who we choose to love, and whether or not we graduated high school or went to college or how much money you have in the bank or whether or not you have a pre-existing condition or whether you are elderly or whether you are not, whether you are developmentally disabled, it does not matter at the polls, because we are all equal in power.

So on November 6 on November 6th, you all got it or you would not be here, but you need to go out the make sure that everyone has their voice heard on November 6th, and we have an incredible opportunity to make history, and the inalienable right to vote because the one place that we are all equal is at the polls. I am here today because I know that you already know that, but I am here to remind you of the power. I am here because I want you to remind others of the power.

Video:

#Oprah on GOP voter suppression in Georgia, "We are not powerless. Every single one of us, every single one of us has the same power at the polls. Every single one of us has something that if done in numbers too big to tamper with that cannot be suppressed and cannot be denied." pic.twitter.com/oem39vQ5Zl read more